Selectmen’s Meeting, June 20th, 2016

As usual, the meeting started with the pledge of allegiance. Everyone stood and faced the flag, and almost everyone recited the pledge. The selectmen’s first order of business was to meet with the cemetery trustees, Sue Weeks and Peter Slusky (Guy Pike was not present because he’s in Europe).

Sue Weeks requested to see the memo from attorney Rick Sager advising the selectmen to “divorce” themselves from the cemetery operations. She stated that she thought the trustees were entitled to see it since it had to do with them and that she had spoken to attorneys at a cemetery trustees workshop that she and Pike attended earlier this month who told her that the trustees should be entitled to see it. Carolyn Sundquist refused, stating that there was no public benefit to letting the trustees see it. Sue Weeks stated that in that case it was evident that Rick Sager is the selectmen’s attorney, not the town’s attorney. The trustees have therefore hired their own attorney. Sue Weeks said that the selectmen and the cemetery trustees should work together and not be at odds. Carolyn Sundquist stated that the only reason for the recent acrimony is that “Mr. Ledoux wrote a letter alleging we broke the law.” That elides the fact that the selectmen did break state law by voting to make a payment on April 25 that they did not have the authority to make.

Discussion then turned to the procedure for when someone comes in to the town office to enquire about purchasing a cemetery lot. The trustees think that the town employees should continue to process the paperwork. At the next trustees meeting, after Guy Pike has returned, the trustees will formalize a procedure for the employees to follow.

There is confusion as to where the monies are to be kept that are collected when a lot is sold. The cemetery trustees were informed at the trustees workshop they attended that lots are considered town property. Both the trustees and the selectmen were surprised by this. In addition, a part of the fee for perpetual care of a lot is supposed to be accounted for each individual grave site. The money in the perpetual care account is supposed to be used for the lots that purchased perpetual care. Some lots, especially those in old cemeteries or old parts of the Town House cemetery, for instance, do not have perpetual care funds allocated to them. For accounting purposes their care is paid for out of the general fund. In addition, a certain percentage of the interest from the cemetery trusts is supposed to be reinvested each year into the principle in order to keep up with inflation. The trustees will do more research on all these matters. The trustees would also like an additional fire-proof filing cabinet for records. The selectmen pledged they will authorize the purchase of that and any other office equipment that the trustees need. Discussion also ensued about declaring some of the cemeteries in town that are on private property to be “abandoned.” This is a legal procedure that will give the town the same rights as descendants of those who are buried in the cemeteries. The descendants will not lose any rights. It will merely allow the town legally to repair grave stones and walls. By state law, the town needs to list the cemeteries in a reputable paper (so not the Granite State News) and then the selectmen must hold a public hearing, which can be at their normal public meeting.

After speaking with the trustees the selectmen turned to the signature file. There was a request, I believe it was to log (I will confirm from the official meeting minutes and update), notice of intent to excavate for a property that is owned by a Trust. Only one of the trustees has signed the request. Selectman Lloyd Wood asked Chairman Sundquist to read into the record a statement the selectman had received (from whom, I’m not sure) via email that all members of a trust do not have to sign and that the selectmen can take a trustee’s  word that they are actually a trustee. If the person misrepresents that they are a trustee then they are liable, not the selectmen, for legal repercussions. Selectmen Sundquist and Bill Marcussen then voted to approve the request (to log?) to excavate and selectman Wood voted against.

Elissa Paquette asked a question about one of the items the selectmen were signing, and Carolyn Sundquist answered. I then asked why Paquette is allowed to ask questions during meetings but the rest of those who attend are asked to wait until the end of the meeting for the public comment period. Carolyn Sundquist replied “because she’s the reporter.” I asked if there was a special exception for Paquette, and Carolyn Sundquist said “Yes.” I asked if the selectmen had voted on that, and she said, “Yes.” I then apologized for breaking the rules (more on that in a later post).

The selectmen reviewed a large amount of correspondence.

Administrative Secretary Karen Koch forwarded the selectmen with a preliminary $5,000 estimate from a company to revamp the town’s sadly out-of-date web site.

Nancy Randlov has resigned as chair of the recycling committee. Lloyd Wood made a motion to accept the resignation and to send Randlov a thank you card. Betsy Frago is resigning from the ZBA board. Lloyd Wood made a motion to accept the resignation and to send Frago a thank you card. Since Frago was also present at the meeting, Wood turned and thanked her personally, echoed by Sundquist and Marcussen.

Administrative Secretary Karen Koch forwarded the selectmen with a preliminary estimate from a company to revamp the town’s sadly out-of-date web site. The estimate is for $5,000.

Another letter informed the town that Time Warner Cable has been bought by Charter Communications. Carolyn Sundquist stated she had also received a letter from TWC/Charter and assumed most other resident in town who are TWC customers will have received the same letter.

A resident of Eaglemere Road wrote to the selectmen to express her desire that the town not pave that road. Lloyd Wood asked if Jim Bean had completed an analysis of the relative costs of maintaining a dirt road versus a paved road, which the selectmen had requested during their roads tour in April. At that time the selectmen had indicated that if they thought paving the road was a good idea then they would put it to Town Meeting for a vote.

The selectmen reported on the various other committee meetings they have attended in recent weeks. Bill Marcussen says there isn’t a lot of milfoil on the lake this year.

Lloyd Wood asked if Jim Bean had filled in the void on Sodom Road at the Melvin River Bridge. Karen Koch said she had not heard from him. However, after the meeting I drove up Sodom Road and saw that the hole had been filled in earlier Monday.

At the previous meeting the selectmen had decided to ask the town employees if they wanted to include benefits as base pay for the sake of retirement contributions. Karen Koch and Clay Gallagher, the transfer station director, both receive lump payments in lieu of health insurance. They have both said that they would like the payment in lieu of health insurance to be counted as base pay. That would increase the retirement contribution. Sundquist asked if the board wanted to make a decision. Marcussen and Wood both said they wanted more information.

The official public comment period was next, then the public meeting ended. The selectmen had a non-public meeting directly after.

Published in Town Government
Max Ledoux

Author: Max Ledoux

I've lived in Tuftonboro since 2014. I grew up in Lisbon Falls, Maine (the Moxie capital of the world). I run tuftonboro.net.

3 thoughts on “Selectmen’s Meeting, June 20th, 2016”

  1. What does it take to be considered a reporter? If you run your own paper and have subscribers? If your a registered news business. If you have credentials from a news firm? lt might be possible for several people from town could be considered reporters.
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