Selectmen Again Refuse to Have Meetings in Evenings, Instead Vote Unanimously to Restrict Public Comment

At Monday’s board of selectmen meeting, which was held at 4 PM when most Tuftonboro residents are at work and unable to attend, Chairman Carolyn Sundquist distractedly sorted her paperwork during the public comment portion of the meeting instead of listening to the concerns of town resident Betsy Frago. During other parts of the public comment portion Sundquist impatiently rapped her fingers on the table.

During public input the selectmen again flatly refused to consider a request to have at least one meeting a month at 6:30 PM.

Chairman Carolyn Sundquist also unilaterally refused a request to allow the public to ask relevant (on topic) questions during meetings. The selectmen had been allowing questions during meetings from Elissa ¬†Paquette, the reporter from the Granite State News who always writes favorable articles about the selectmen. After a letter I wrote expressing my opinion that it was a form of unconstitutional viewpoint discrimination to allow one ¬†person and no others to ask questions, Sundquist on September 13 unilaterally announced that the board would no longer take questions from Paquette or anyone else. During this week’s meeting Sundquist confirmed that there was no discussion of the matter by the board, and that she alone made the decision, saying “I eliminated questions.”

When questioned if the chair has the authority to make decisions about who can talk at meetings without being granted the authority to do so by a majority vote of the board, Sundquist hastily made a motion “to not allow public input during our meeting, and only at the end.”

Selectmen Lloyd P. Wood immediately seconded the motion, saying “I’m very pleased with that motion.”

Sundquist said, “apparently everything we do needs some kind of motion. Even though as chairman I do run the meeting, and if I hear from counsel that you can not allow one person to speak and not another, then I eliminate–and make it fair for everybody.”

Wood agreed, “Yes, the case law on that is very clear on that. It’s unfortunate, but unfortunately we have to operate that way.”

“Exactly,” said Sundquist.

Selectmen Bill Marcussen remained completely mute throughout the entire discussion, but joined Sundquist and Wood on voting Aye to pass the motion to not allow any questions from anyone during the meeting, but to allow a public input section at the end of the meeting, after votes have taken place when the public input is meaningless.

After the selectmen voted, I asked Sundquist to confirm that the attorney had told her it was illegal to allow one person to speak and not another. She replied, “he didn’t say that it was illegal… he said you really shouldn’t allow one person.”

Wood repeated that “the case law is clear.”

Notes from the video:

The reason the selectmen voted not to allow questions from anyone until after the meeting: https://tuftonboro.net/max/town-government/letter-selectmen-questions-meetings/

New Hampshire Municipal Association, Selecting the Rules for Boards of Selectmen: https://www.nhmunicipal.org/TownAndCity/Article/323

New Hampshire Revised Statues Annotated (RSA) 41:8, CHOICE AND DUTIES OF TOWN OFFICERS ; Selectmen: http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/III/41/41-8.htm

Court awards $40,000 in damages in Alton free speech case : http://www.unionleader.com/article/20160504/NEWS21/160509656

New Hampshire Retirement System lowers assumed rate of return to 7.25%: http://www.pionline.com/article/20160525/ONLINE/160529932/new-hampshire-retirement-system-lowers-assumed-rate-of-return-to-725

Pension board hits state with $420 million tab: http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160826/NEWS02/160829890/pension-board-hits-state-with-420-million-tab

Published in Town Government
Max Ledoux

Author: Max Ledoux

I've lived in Tuftonboro since 2014. I grew up in Lisbon Falls, Maine (the Moxie capital of the world). I run tuftonboro.net.

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