Jack Widmer Misleads on Glenn Cordelli

Speaking on Saturday, Tuftonboro Treasurer Jack Widmer misleadingly stated that state representative Glenn Cordelli (R-Tuftonboro) had co-sponsored a bill that would have raised the school tax rate in Tuftonboro.

“That particular bill, unfortunately, was co-sponsored by Clay [sic] Cordelli, our state representative,” Jack said.

Although Glenn initially put his name on the bill as a co-sponsor, he withdrew his support when the final text of the bill was made available. In fact, he not only voted against the bill in the Education Committee, Glenn was the one who made the motion to kill the bill.

From page seven of the February 2, 2018, House Record:

HB 1452, relative to equalized property valuation used to apportion expenses in cooperative school districts.

INEXPEDIENT TO LEGISLATE.

Rep. Glenn Cordelli for Education. There are 33 cooperative school districts. Each has an existing and differing agreement on the apportionment formula to determine the amount to be paid by each town. While this bill raises the valid discussion of the formula of attendance vs. town equalized valuation, it would not be appropriate for the state to intercede in these local agreements. Vote 19-0.

When informed that Glenn had voted against the final bill, Jack tried to dismiss that fact by saying: “My feeling about that is, and not to get into an argument about it, but, my feeling is, you don’t put your name on a bill unless you know what you’re putting your name on.”

This seems petty to me. There are many reasons to co-sponsor a bill initially, before the text of a bill is finalized. What I think matters most is the final vote.

The fact of the matter, no matter whether Jack tries to brush it aside, is that Glenn voted against the bill.

Here is Jack’s entire presentation on Saturday (discussion of education bills starts around the 7:00 mark).

Watch the entire library information open house here.

UPDATE:

It turns out Jack gave wrong information about the potential tax affect of taking out a loan for the library addition and renovation. Paul Matlock corrected the record on the adjoining post:

There is an error in the presentation. When asked, Jack reports that the tax rate could be as low as 2.5 cents per thousand which would mean a $200,000 house would pay only an extra $5 a year. After the meeting, I started wondering about this. Jack has since confirmed that the added tax would be 10 plus cents for the principal payment with the finance cost added to this. My estimate is up to 14 cents per thousand, meaning that that 200,000 house would pay an extra $28 a year.
Sorry for the confusion.
Paul Matlock
Library trustee

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Max Ledoux

Author: Max Ledoux

I've lived in Tuftonboro since 2014. I grew up in Lisbon Falls, Maine (the Moxie capital of the world). I run tuftonboro.net.

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