Selectmen Lose Right to Know Suit, at Cost to Taxpayers of Almost $20,000

The selectmen have lost their lawsuit against Bob McWhirter and me. Carroll County Superior Court Judge Amy Ignatius issued her decision on August 8, finding that the selectmen cannot charge us a fee to inspect governmental records, whether they be electronic or paper. This is not an earth-shattering decision. I don’t mean to disrespect Judge Ignatius’s judicial ability, but the law states, “No fee shall be charged for the inspection or delivery, without copying, of governmental records whether they be paper, electronic, or other format.” I honestly have no idea why the selectmen thought that meant they could charge us a fee to inspect governmental records.

But they gave it the old college try, anyway, and spent almost $20,000 of taxpayer money in the process.

The board at the time was Carolyn Sundquist, Bill Marcussen, and Lloyd Wood. Carolyn Sundquist has since left the board.

The selectmen have 30 days to appeal the decision.

David Taylor of Right to Know New Hampshire, summarizes the decision here:

The Town of Tuftonboro, N.H. lost its effort to charge $0.15 per page to redact emails provided electronically. Judge Amy Ignatius in Carroll County Superior Court ruled that redacting emails electronically does not substantively change their format nor does it incur actual costs that can be charged. The town had not sought to be reimbursed for the time it takes employees to redact the emails, and they provided no evidence of other expenses.

Unlike most Right-to-Know Law cases where a citizen sues for access to records or meetings, in this case the Town of Tuftonboro took 2 of its residents to court. The town basically wanted the court to declare whether the town could charge for redacted records. Since the citizens had to respond to the preemptive lawsuit by hiring a lawyer, they sought help from supporters. The town sought for details about those supporters, but the court also denied that request. In spite of the burden imposed by the town on the citizens, the court did not award attorney’s fees or court costs because the issue of redaction costs was not settled law and therefor the town did not “know or should have known” it was improperly denying access. The town has 30 days until September 7, 2017 to appeal. The full court order is available here.

Published in Board of Selectmen
Max Ledoux

Author: Max Ledoux

I've lived in Tuftonboro since 2014. I grew up in Lisbon Falls, Maine (the Moxie capital of the world). I run tuftonboro.net. If you'd like your own blog here, click the "Get Free Blog" link in the menu at the top of the page. Everyone is welcome to write about anything they like.

4 thoughts on “Selectmen Lose Right to Know Suit, at Cost to Taxpayers of Almost $20,000”

  1. Great news Max! As I said at dinner I thought you were going to loose. Congratulations!!!!!!!!!

  2. I’m still at a loss why there had to be defendants for the Selectmen to ask a Judges opinion/advice.

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