FREE COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING – August in Tuftonboro

Would you like to know how to respond to a local emergency in order to protect and assist your family, friends and your community?

In just 20 hours, learn how to provide basic first aid, search and rescue victims safely, manage utilities, put out small fires and effectively help your family and community during a local crisis.

This training will be held at the Tuftonboro Central Fire Department on Friday August 18th, 6-9pm, Saturday August 19th, 9am – 5pm and on Saturday August 26th, 9am – 5pm. Each day will cover different topics of emergency response.

You may take the entire course in Tuftonboro, or in part – there will be other training locations and dates throughout the year; it is possible to complete the training in segments over a period of time, for your convenience.

This free event is generously offered by CERT, Granite United Way and Carroll County Coalition for Public Health.

For more information, and to pre-register ( required to ensure minimum enrollment requirements ) please call Jeff Jones at 603-301-1251 ext. 304 .

 

 

 

“….the times that try men’s souls.”

Pre-result,  Election Night, 2016:

These are the times that try men’s souls.

The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.

Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.

What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly:

it is dearness only that gives everything its value.

Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated.
Thomas Paine,  The Crisis. December 23, 1776

Let (Does?) Freedom Reign

I love America. Period. End. No perfection here, not in my little town, or in this state (“where is New Hampshire, again??”). And certainly there is no perfection in ‘politics’ – in any level of our ‘democratic’ and ‘representative’ governments.

“Perfection” was not written into the Bill of Rights, nor the Constitution.

FREEDOM was, and should continue to be, the basic tenet of our American lives.

Our Revolution waged over 8 years, unofficially started here in NH with the first “revolutionary” military activity between Loyalists and Patriots, with the capture of Fort William in December 1774. There were 6 battles in NH, 12 in Mass., and 137 in South Carolina alone.

In all, there were 1,546 military engagements over the course of those 8 long years.

Total American deaths: 6,824 (90% were from the Continental Army), 10,000 deaths from disease and another 8,500 died in British prisons.

The ratio of American deaths to the free white male demographic, was 1 in 20. This ratio would equal 3 million today.

24,000 British boys and men died “for” “our” Revolution.

There were 80,000 colonial inhabitants living mainly along the New England coast, when the Revolution broke out. Of the 2.5 million people having made this their new home, 20% were black slaves.

In 1775, the slave population of Virginia was 40%, NY 14%, Connecticut 8% and Rhode Island %.

Clearly, “we” had yet to graciously broaden the scope of “freedom,” that bloody perspective, (or lack of) destined to stain American soils for decades, scores and a few scary centuries to come.

Sadly, our country has become diseased and it would appear, to this citizen, anyway, that freedom, no longer reigns. Not in Tuftonboro, not in New Hampshire (“Live Free or Die”), or in America.

My country , ‘Tis of Thee, Sweet Land of Liberty, of Thee I sing.
Land where my Fathers’ died, Land of the Pilgrims Pride,
From ev’ry mountain side, let Freedom ring.

My native country, Thee
Land of the noble free,
Thy name I love;
I love thy rocks and rills
Thy woods and templed hills;
My heart with rapture thrills
Like that above.

Let music swell the breeze,
And ring from all the trees
Sweet Freedom’s song;
Let mortal’s tongue awake;
Let all that breathe partake;
Let rocks their silence break
The sound prolong.

Samuel Francis Smith, written 1831.